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Sugar Free September

2016 August 22
by David

Why go sugar-free?

Sugar – it’s a comforting substance that we treat ourselves to in times of celebration, when we’re feeling in need of a ‘pick-me-up’, or just out of habit. But it doesn’t just stop there – what about the sugars we unwittingly consume on a daily basis that manufacturers sneak into our food and drinks?

Sugar-Free September is an ideal time to really focus on this one ingredient and learn a lot about how it’s added to foods and drinks and what it does to our bodies and teeth. Giving up added sugar for 30 days (and beyond!) can have many benefits to your oral health and overall health:

Reduce the chance of tooth decay

“Every time we have something sugary to eat or drink, bacteria in our mouths feed on this sugar and produce harmful acids, which can cause tooth decay,” advises Henry Clover, Chief Dental Officer at Denplan. “It then takes our saliva around an hour to neutralise these acids and return our mouths to normal. This means the more times a day you expose your teeth to sugar, the more you increase your chances of tooth decay. This is why sugar is always best kept as an occasional treat rather than having a constant presence in your daily diet.”

Why go sugar free?

Giving up processed sugar can have many benefits on your oral health and overall health

As well as reducing your risk of tooth decay, you may also experience weight loss, improved skin and increased energy levels!

You may lose weight

Sugar is calorific and it’s easy to pile the pounds on when you’re unknowingly eating items that have had sugar added to them. It can also lead to unwanted fat storage according to Claire White, author of Sugar Snub and nutritional advisor: “When our stores of glucose in our muscles and liver are full, any extra sugar, particularly fructose, is converted to fat. We can deal with fructose in fruits for example (don’t stop eating fruit!), but food manufacturers have created Fructose Glucose Syrup and filled fizzy drinks, junk food, and many supermarket foods with it.”

More energy

It’s a common misconception that sugar is a good option for keeping you energised throughout the day. Although sugar does provide a boost of energy, its effects are short-lived and can actually make you feel worse. “It takes just 30 minutes to go from a chocolate bar sugar-high to a sugar crash,” advises Claire. Lean protein and good quality carbohydrates such as wholewheat pasta and brown rice are good options for keeping you fueled.

Help your skin

Did you know that sugar has been linked to premature aging? Over-consumption of sugar can weaken collagen and elastin, accelerating the rate at which wrinkles appear. Some people also report they have clearer, less spot-prone skin when they reduce their sugar consumption.

Type 2 diabetes and heart disease

Researchers are increasingly finding links between high sugar diets and conditions such as heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. We know that high sugar diets increase your chances of weight gain, and being overweight is thought to be a major cause of both Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Reduce your sugar cravings

“Sugar and junk foods can cause massive releases of dopamine in the reward part of the brain,” says Claire. “This, for many people, can become strongly addictive.”

 

 

Importance of Mouth Guards When Playing Contact Sport

2016 April 6
by David

Why a mouth guard?mouth guards

Mouthguards or sportsguards offer unbeatable protection against sporting injuries to the teeth, jaw, neck and brain. They protect (most commonly) from broken and damaged teeth and broken or dislocated jaws. The American Dental Association (ADA) found more than 200,000 oral injuries are prevented each year by wearing a mouth guard.

Put simply, a mouthguard is a plastic horseshoe shaped cover that fits exactly over the teeth and gums, cushioning them and protecting them from damage. Rather like you wearing a helmet when riding a bicycle, you wear your mouthguard whilst playing sports. Custom-made mouthguards can prevent damage to the jaw, neck and even the brain – helping to prevent the concussion and damage caused by a heavy blow.

What type of mouthguard?

Self fit

A self fit is designed for average size mouths that are heated up to mould to better fit the mouth. Opro sells a range of these types of guards. They are better than nothing, but much harder to wear and do not offer the same levels of protection as a custom fit.

Custom fit

A custom fit mouthguard, made from moulds of your mouth, will provide YOU with the best protection. It will also be more slimline and comfortable to wear. It features indentations of the lower teeth on its biting surface so the lower jaw is safely immobilised on impact, preventing reverberation of the brain. A custom-fit mouthguard can also have your name imprinted on it – so it will not be mixed up on the field or in the locker rooms!

A custom mouthguard offer different levels of protection, depending on the sport you will be playing. If your sport does not use a hard stick or ball and where the head is not an intentional target – you can wear a slimmer mouthguard. For example in rugby and judo.

High-impact sports that do use a hard stick or ball – or where the head is a target – need a stronger mouthguard. For example, in hockey, lacrosse, boxing and martial arts. Woodcock Lane Dental Care also makes different types of protective guards should you clench and grind your teeth – and these are designed to be worn whilst you sleep.

What about shop sold mouthguards, aren’t they as good?

No. The “boil and bite” types provide a false sense of protection and make it hard to breathe and talk whilst in place. The recommendation of the British Dental Association, the Rugby Football Union and the English Hockey Association is that only custom-fit mouthguards should be worn.

What colours and designs do you have?

Your imagination is the limit. The most popular and cheaper designs are single colours but you can have stripes, favourite team’s colours or even opt to match your own sports strip.

In what sports do you need to wear a mouthguard?

Football, wrestling, soccer, basketball, american football, boxing, rugby, hockey, lacrosse, skateboarding and martial arts to name the most common.

Can I wear a mouthguard if I have braces?

Yes, we have two types available which can be purchased over the counter at Woodcock Lane Dental Care. One is a solid item which can be worn throughout orthodontic treatment. The other product can be remoulded to a certain extent to accommodate the changes in teeth position.  They will not only protect the teeth but also prevent the inside of the lips and cheeks from becoming cut by the wires of the brace in the event of an impact to the face.

How to look after a mouthguard?

You should clean your mouthguard with cool water after each use. Once a week, you should give your guard a more thorough cleaning with a toothbrush and soap ( not toothpaste as this can damage and discolour the guard). Dry the mouth guard thoroughly before placing it in its container. You could use special cleansing tablets, which are available here at our practice in Woodcock Lane. Most importantly, do not machine wash or place your mouthguard in the dishwasher. At all times, it should be at all times in your protective carrying case or your mouth.

How long does a mouthguard last?

This varies according to many factors, e.g. growth, usage etc. If you are a growing child, new teeth will come through meaning you would require a new mouthguard around once a year. Although the teeth and bones may be growing, the mouthguards are flexible, and can accommodate some movement. Older children and adults may not grow, but the mouthguard will wear down with use and should be checked annually by your dentist.

For advice on the most appropriate sports mouthguard for you see one of our dentists at Woodcock Lane Dental Care. Call 01453 828327 to arrange an appointment.

Why Should I Visit My Dentist Regularly?

2016 January 13
by David

Modern dentistry is all about keeping your teeth tip top by preventing issues from gaining a foothold, rather than the Dark Ages when you only went to see a dentist if a problem had become so serious you were almost climbing the walls in pain and needed teeth removed. While Woodcock Lane Dental Care offers convenient emergency dentist services at our Stonehouse practice and a number of solutions like dental implants to restore your smile after you’ve damaged or lost teeth, we certainly don’t want to see our patients in such dire straits if it can all too easily be avoided!

Why It’s So Important to Visit Your Dentist Regularly
Your regular dentist check-up and hygienist clean is vitally important for these reasons:
• Your dentist is trained to spot a range of oral issues, from cavities needing filling before major work is needed, to checking for mouth cancer and monitoring your gum health (infected gums cause a host of health problems in addition to eventually losing their ability to hold your teeth firmly in place, and once they recede they cannot be restored to normal again).
• Your hygienist is also essential because they effectively remove plaque (the harmful bacteria that is generated daily) from places your toothbrush can’t reach. What’s more, plaque hardens into stubborn tartar if left to its own devices, and this needs to be scraped away using a special tool. The process is called scaling and it’s a must if you want healthy teeth into your old age.
Why You May Need to See Your Dentist More Often 
It’s important to bear in mind that each person is unique. The frequency of your recall depends on:
• Genetics
• Diet
• Amount of dental work already in your mouth
• Your level of oral hygiene
You may be used to sailing through your dental check-up and hygienist clean twice a year, but circumstances can change and you may be in need of more frequent visits without realising it.
If you tick any of the following boxes, you run the risk of oral health issues cropping up so you’ll want to visit your dental practice more often to keep your teeth and gums in good health. Let your dentist know if any of these criteria apply to you so they can be extra vigilant and prescribe a treatment program to make sure things don’t get out of hand:
• I smoke;
• I have a family history of gum weakness or disease;
• I’m diabetic;
• I have a sweet tooth and eat lots of sugary foods;
• I’m pregnant;
• I’m on medication that gives me a dry mouth;
• I tend to have a weak immune system;
• My teeth are prone to getting cavities or plaque build-up;
• I don’t have time to brush my teeth thoroughly twice a day for at least two minutes.
Also bear in mind that as we get older our bodies become less robust, meaning we’re not as easily able to fight off harmful bacteria (plaque) and keep infection at bay.

Conclusion
Because we’re each unique and have changing circumstances, it’s important that you never miss your regular check-up – this will allow your dentist and hygienist to flag any issues and prescribe more frequent treatments if needed to nip problems in the bud. And if you fit any of the above risk scenarios, it’s even more important to visit your dentist more often so we can keep you safeguarded.

How to tackle sensitive teeth pain

2015 November 24
by David


Whether you have a slightly sensitive tooth or an entire area that makes you go “ouch” every time you eat something cold, acidic or sweet, this guide is here to tell you there’s no need to put up with it. Woodcock Lane Dental Care is going to explain the causes and treatments available to help you stamp out sensitive teeth pain.

What Causes Sensitive Teeth?

These are the main reasons for that vexing tooth tenderness many of us suffer:

  • Dental Procedures – it’s natural to have teeth sensitivity following procedures such as a crown placement, tooth extraction or even an in-depth clean from the hygienist. If however the sensitivity persists, it’s important you have a check-up with your dentist in case you have an infection of some sort or a chipped/cracked tooth you’re not aware of.
  • Teeth Grinding – a common habit, grinding teeth is often something people do while sleeping which makes it tricky to tackle. This grinding action can wear out the outer layer of your teeth called enamel, thus exposing the dentin, which contains the hollow canals that lead to the nerve network in your mouth. Ouch.
  • Filling Deterioration – over time fillings can weaken and fracture around the edges, leaving tiny crevices that invite enamel damage and acid build-up.
  • Gum Disease – this condition causes receding gums, which leave your teeth nerves exposed. Since gums that have receded significantly cannot return to normal again, it’s vital to have regular check-ups so your dentist and hygienist can nip the problem in the bud.
  • Sketchy Dental Hygiene – if you don’t floss daily as well as brush your teeth in the morning and at night right before you go to sleep, plaque builds up which causes both gum disease and enamel damage. Both of these issues, if left unchecked, will leave your teeth nerves exposed.
  • Overdoing Brushing – if you go at your teeth with the same gusto as you clean an oven, or use a toothbrush that has overly hard bristles, this can damage the protective enamel covering your teeth. Hence the tenderness when you eat or drink.
  • Frequently Eating Acidic Foods – highly acidic foods like most fruits (especially ones like lemon, grapefruit and kiwi) also damage your protective enamel, leaving your nerves exposed.
  • Tooth Whitening Products – some people are more sensitive than others to the chemical bleach in many whitening products, while people who already have exposed nerves will experience even higher levels of discomfort. Some whitening products are very acidic which dissolves your teeth making them more sensitive.
  • Mouthwashes that Contain Alcohol – those with exposed nerves will find over-the-counter mouth washes that have alcohol and other aggressive chemicals as ingredients aggravating to their sensitivity condition.

Sensitive Teeth – Treatment Solutions

While the main point is to ensure your dental hygiene is good to prevent the enamel decay that leaves your teeth nerves exposed, these are solutions to more specific causes of sensitivity:

  • Teeth Grinding – the most common and effective solution to this habit is to wear a fitted mouth guard at night while you sleep. There are a number of different types – ask your dentist to help you find a mouth guard that feels comfortable.
  • Filling Deterioration – it’s important to have a check-up regularly so your dentist can replace any fillings that have deteriorated.
  • Gum Disease – this condition is more common that most people might think. Your dentist can place a sealing liquid on the areas of your teeth where major damage has occurred to stop the tooth sensitivity, and if the condition is advanced they will refer you to a periodontist (gum specialist).
  • Overdoing Brushing – make sure to be thorough yet gentle when brushing twice a day, and if in doubt about whether your toothbrush bristles are too hard, ask your dentist or hygienist.
  • Frequently Eating Acidic Foods – it’s important to rinse your mouth with water after eating fruit and other acidic foods so the acid doesn’t go to town on the protective enamel that coats your teeth.
  • Mouthwashes that Contain Alcohol – buy alcohol-free products. Neutral fluoride rinses are even better because they help to repair enamel damage.

Conclusion

While Sensodyne is the market leader in toothpaste for sensitive teeth there are lots of toothpastes for sensitive teeth that can be bought over the counter, if you suffer from this condition your dentist can prescribe an even better fix – high volume fluoride toothpaste which helps to repair damaged enamel. The main thing to remember however is this: don’t simply put up with sensitive teeth pain – make sure you visit your dentist if the problem persists because not only is it treatable, it could be a symptom of a more serious dental problem.

21 Things You Need to Know About Mouth Cancer Which Could Save Someone’s Life

2015 November 2
by David

mouthawareIt’s November and at Woodcock Lane Dental Care we are pleased to be supporting  Mouth Cancer Action Month, a campaign dedicated to raising awareness of the signs and symptoms of mouth cancer and promoting the importance of early detection in ultimately saving lives. Organised by the British Dental Health Foundation, Mouth Cancer Action Month is your chance to make a difference. By knowing the facts around mouth cancer we will have the ability to stop this disease in its tracks. We have put together 21 facts you really need to know and may shock you about mouth cancer, how many do you know?

  1. In the UK, one person is told they have mouth cancer every 77 minutes.
  2. This is almost 7 thousand people every year.
  3. Mouth cancer claims more lives than testicular and cervical cancer combined.
  4. Mouth cancer takes more lives every year than road traffic accidents on Britain’s roads.
  5. Mouth cancer is diagnosed in more than twice as many men than women but there are more cases in women than ever before.
  6. Shockingly, one in ten have never heard of mouth cancer.
  7. Cases of mouth cancer have increased by a third in the last decade alone.
  8. Survival rates based on a late diagnosis are as little as 50% but chances of survival drastically increase with an early diagnosis to 90%.
  9. Scotland has more cases per capita than in England, Northern Ireland or Wales.
  10. Mouth cancer is one of very few cancers which incidences are actually predicted to increase in the future.
  11. Smoking is the leading cause of mouth cancer.
  12. But HPV is predicted to overtake it as the leading cause of mouth cancer in the next decade.
  13. HPV is predominantly transmitted through oral sex.
  14. Extending the HPV vaccine to include boys of a school age could save thousands of lives.
  15. Excessive use of alcohol is linked to more than a third of mouth cancer cases in men and a fifth in women.
  16. Heavy drinkers and smokers are up to 35 times more at risk.
  17. Mouth cancer can often be spotted in its early stages by your dentist during a thorough mouth examination.
  18. As part of every check-up a dentist is required to carry out a visual examination to look for the early signs of mouth cancer.
  19. Mouth cancer can affect anyone.
  20. Signs and symptoms of mouth cancer include: ulcers which do not heal within three weeks, red or white patches and any unusual lumps or swellings.
  21. If in doubt get checked out by your dentist or doctor as soon as possible.

With your help Mouth Cancer Action Month is the perfect opportunity to fight back against mouth cancer, we want everyone to be Mouthaware and be on the lookout for the signs and symptoms of mouth cancer.

Share these facts to spread awareness of mouth cancer to everyone and ensure we are all together in combating mouth cancer.

Top Tips to Care for Your Baby’s Teeth

2015 October 8
by David

baby-teethKeeping your baby’s teeth healthy and introducing your child to good dental habits that are ingrained for life is vitally important. This guide gives parents all the key info you need at your fingertips.

When to Start Brushing Baby Teeth

Baby teeth tend to sprout out at around four to six months – as soon as the first one appears, it needs gentle brushing because plaque is a problem no matter what the age.

You might want to also softly clean your baby’s gums with a clean wet cloth after feedings. This gets them used to dental hygiene from the earliest age and creates the ideal clean environment for their new teeth to appear.

How to Brush Baby Teeth

Here are the steps that have been proven to work best:

  1. Buy an ultra soft toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste that’s designed for young children i.e. fluoride is necessary as it helps prevent tooth decay, but the typical brands used by adults are too strong for your little one. Check that the fluoride quota is at least 1,000ppm but no more than 1,350ppm.
  2. The easiest position is to sit your baby upright and facing away from as this allows more control when it comes to keeping their head still.
  3. Brush gently in small circular motions for about two minutes, with your main focus on where the gum meets the tooth. This should be done twice a day – in the morning and after their last feed before you put them to bed at night.
  4. When your child starts teething, be ultra gentle as their gums will be very sore.

A great tip is to brush your teeth in front of your baby as often as possible. Since children learn by copying, this will teach them to perceive brushing as a normal part of daily routine.

Tackling a Teething Baby

Teething generally starts occurring in babies at around six months. This means that they will be suffering from uncomfortably sore, red gums since their teeth will be pushing through for the first time. Some children start earlier – common signs of teething include swollen gums, increased chewing and dribbling, irritability and flushed cheeks.

Here are the best ways to help your little one through this trying time:

  • Do your best to keep them distracted with fun activities.
  • Be vigilant about wiping away excessive drooling or your baby will end up doubly irritated by stinging skin on their chin.
  • Chilled teething rings are a great help as they sooth irritated gums.
  • When you can see your baby is in pain, good solutions are to gently apply (sugar-free) teething gel directly to their gums to numb them, or as a last resort, give them a dose of (sugar-free) medicine designed for babies, such as Calpol or ​Nurofen for Children.

Why Dummies Are Best Avoided

Dummies were once a staple for babies and might seem like a good idea to help with teething problems, but we (and the British Dental Health Foundation are in agreement) advise against making dummies a habit. The reason for this is that dummies place pressure on your baby’s mouth and can cause their fledgling teeth to move out of alignment.

When to Bring Your Baby to the Dentist

We suggest you bring your baby along whenever you have an appointment, as this gets them familiar with the sounds and smells of a dental surgery. The first time to book your little one in for a baby dental check-up is usually around 18 months.

Conclusion

Being vigilant about caring for your baby’s teeth and gums from a very young age not only prevents problems developing as they grow bigger, it also ensures your child becomes used to good dental hygiene as an essential part of everyday life. If you’ve any questions about your baby’s teething issues or other dental problems, our trained staff at Woodcock Lane Dental Care are on hand to help.

 

Remember we are able to see children under the age of 18 and under 19 if still in full time education on the NHS.

10 Reasons to Brush Your Teeth

2015 August 24
by David

Oral health is more than just healthy teeth. Your mouth reflects your general health and well being.

brushing teeth close up

These are the 10 most powerful reasons you should brush your teeth:

1. Save money. Prevention is cheaper than cure. Regular daily care of your teeth and gums will prevent problems in the future and leave you with lower dental bills.

2. Fresh Breath. Your mouth will start to smell if you do not clean it regularly. Clean your mouth out at least once per day.

3. Stay kissable. Who wants to kiss someone with food between their teeth or bad breath? Brushing is the cheapest and most effective way to remove food & bacteria.

4. Prevent gum disease. Gingivitis (inflammation of the gums and the first stage of gum disease) is caused by the plaque build-up around your teeth, leading to swollen gums and teeth that bleed when you brush them. Plaque is an accumulation of food and bacteria which appears in everyone’s mouth.

5. Reduce your chance of a heart attack or stroke. Bacteria from your mouth can make its way into your bloodstream and increase you chance of a heart attack or stroke.

6. Prevent or minimise Diabetes. Any gum disease can make it harder to control your blood glucose. The relationship between serious gum disease and diabetes is two-way. Not only are people with diabetes more susceptible to serious gum disease, but serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes.

7. Have a healthy baby. Gum disease has been shown to increase the chance of premature birth and low birth weight. It can also be one of the many causes of delayed conception and impotence. So get your mouth and gums healthy first.

8. Prevent Dementia. Poor oral health increases your risk of developing dementia by a third.

9. Toothpaste on your brush is the best way to apply fluoride and other desensitizers. Fluoride in toothpastes becomes part of a tooth’s surface, protecting the enamel from the acid released by plaque.

10. Remove stains. There are mild abrasives in toothpaste that remove debris and surface stains. Examples include calcium carbonate, dehydrated silica gels, hydrated aluminium oxides, magnesium carbonate, phosphate salts and silicates.

That 2 minutes brush, twice a day can literately save your life. The Dentist, Hygienist and Oral Health Educator at Woodcock Lane can show you the most effective way to brush, give us a call.

 

 

Bruxism – Causes, Symptoms and Treatments for Tooth Grinding

2015 July 28
by David

Bruxism is a medical term to describe teeth grinding. In a little more detail it covers a range of actions that involve the teeth, the jaw the muscles of the jaw and the temperomandibular joint ( TMJ ).
The symptoms can range from a mild disturbance to pain so severe that patients can not sleep or work.

are you grinding your teeth

It can effect children and adults but main age range is 25-45.

Two main types..

Daytime or awake Bruxism..this usually involves just a clenching of the jaw in response to a stimuli .
Asleep bruxism occurs when one is asleep and often involves jaw clenching combined with a grinding of the teeth and contraction of the jaw muscles . Usually there is an associated noise as the teeth move over each other.

What are the causes ?

Bruxism has a multitude of causes and it can be difficult to highlight one as the main cause, however a few of the causes discussed are:

  1. Incorrect tooth alignment. If your teeth are not in the correct position then it can lead to the teeth meeting in a different position. This leads to the muscles attached to the jaw being stretched in a way they are not comfortable and this can lead to muscular pains such as head and neck ache. The teeth receive a message from the brain indicating the discrepancy in the bite and try to grind their way to a more comfortable position. This in turn leads to more symptoms, and so in turn leads to more pain. The best way to correct this is to move the teeth back in to a correct position, from something as simple as a minor filing of the tops of the teeth ( occlusal equilibration) or to Orthodontics ( braces). The orthodontic process is usually reserved for extreme cases.
  2. Stress. Just like mouth ulcers, cold sores and stomach ulcers all increase propensity with onset of stress. So does the occurrence of bruxism, as a result the best way to treat this cause would be to find ways to de-stress. The largest cause of bruxism is stress related. Exercise and life changes to encourage a more relaxed environment would help …though not always possible !
  3. other conditions…there is a strong link to Obstructive Sleep Apnea and patients who suffer from this also get episodes of bruxism in the night.
  4. Stimulants ….regular users of alcohol, drugs, tobacco and caffeine ( more than 6 cups a day)….all of these stimuli can cause disturbed sleep which can result in increased occurrence of bruxism.

What are the symptoms ?

They are wide ranging but main ones are
• Soreness from muscles of the head and neck
• More sensitive teeth, if they begin to wear down
• Clicking or popping noises from the jaw joint
• Lock jaw when jaw is opened wide
• Headaches, neckaches and shoulder pains
• Limited opening of the jaw
• Earaches

What are the treatments?

There is wide debate in the dental community as to what is the best treatment. The truth is that the most important part is that the patient is seen by the dentist and a thorough history is taken. This allows the dentist to identify most obvious reasons for this bruxism and the extent it impinges on the patients life.

Models and photographs of the teeth should be taken, as well as listening to any noises of the jaw joint. A simple night time splint can be worn to take the load off the joint and also balance the way the two jaws meet. This is called an Occlusal splint and has the effect of reducing the load on the muscles. A splint is a laboratory constructed plastic that is hardened and designed bespoke to each patient to accommodate and reduce the effects of grinding. It can be quite dramatic how much it can improve and how quickly this is noticed.

Additional treatments could include anti stress medication, orthodontics to move the teeth and lifestyle changes.

Circus Time

2015 June 17
by David

We at Woodcock Lane Dental Care are proud to support Circus Starr – the circus with a purpose.

We are delighted to have been able to support our local Stroud and Stonehouse community by buying and donating tickets for disadvantaged and disabled children and their families to go this fantastic event that was held in a big top at Cheltenham Racecourse at the weekend.

Circus certificateCircus Starr is a touring circus boasting world-class, professional artists from across the globe. It was first founded in 1987 to help raise much needed funds for local charities whilst providing free seats for thousands of disadvantaged, disabled or vulnerable children.  

 

 

National Smile Month

2015 May 20
by David

All of us at Woodcock Lane Dental Care are getting behind the UK’s largest and longest-running oral health campaign this month in a bid to raise awareness of the importance of good oral health. DSC_0051

National Smile Month was established in 1977 and is the UK’s biggest annual oral health campaign. The campaign is sponsored by headline sponsors Invisalign, Wrigleys and Oral-B. The campaign, which runs from 18 May to 18 June 2015, is also being supported by Denplan, the UK’s leading dental payment plan specialist. The campaign promotes three key messages for great oral health:

  • Brush your teeth last thing at night and on at least one other occasion that day with a fluoride toothpaste
  • Cut down on how often you have sugary foods and drinks
  • Visit your dentist regularly, as often as they recommend

If you would like to improve your smile, we would be delighted to help you. Jackie, our hygienist, is able to look after the health of your gums and polish your teeth. David Lyons and Frank Moran, our dentists, are able to provide not only routine dental care but also cosmetic treatments such as tooth coloured fillings, veneers and crowns and tooth whitening. David is also able to offer tooth straightening and  James MacDonald, our visiting dental implant dentist is able to offer dental implants.

 

If you are interested in any of our services, our friendly reception team are on hand to answer any queries or questions on 01453 828327.

 

Happy smiling 🙂